brand governance Archives | Spencer Brenneman, LLC

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Changing a Name Brand. A name brand you recognize decides to change their name. The world is shocked, right? Dunkin’ Donuts goes to just Dunkin’. Weight Watchers goes to just ‘WW.’ Kentucky Fried Chicken is just ‘KFC.’ Well, annoyances aside, changing a company name can be a smart move, if aligned with the brand strategy. Changing a name brand in a vacuum is never a good idea, and the result will be a piecemeal company with glaring inconsistencies.   Real World Examples. Take the above example. Dunkin’ Donuts changing their name just to Dunkin’. When this move happened, I saw numerous comments on the internet about how stupid this was. How this would be regarded as one of the biggest branding blunders in history. [tweetshare tweet="Changing

On our own website, we state that no logo can exist in a vacuum. To create a new logo, without any clear marketing or differentiated branding strategy behind it would, as we say, require magic. Meredith Verdone, Chief Marketing Officer at Bank of America, seems to understand this well. She says that Bank of America’s recent logo and brand strategy are going together hand-in-hand. The new campaign’s focus? “What would you like the power to do?” [tweetshare tweet="To create a new logo, without any clear marketing or differentiated branding strategy behind it would, as we say, require magic. " username="SB_Branding"] By focusing on the fact that their new campaign is empowering the consumer, they are thus making their consumer base care about their

Winter. Love it, hate it, tolerate it, the season brings out a lot of emotions in people. If you’re lucky enough to live in Southern California, then you have a bit of a different definition of what winter is compared to those of us who live in New England.   Winter up here can be cold, snowy, and emotionally draining for many people. The most important thing on people’s minds during the season: staying warm.   Now, this may not seem like an opportunity to retune your brand strategy. Why would you bother getting people to care about your brand when they’re busy caring about staying warm?   Well, winter can actually be the perfect time of year to engage your consumer base

‘Tis the season… when some 2 billion holiday cards and 500 million e-cards create a blizzard of good wishes. We’ve all received ones that wowed us (and others that made us cringe). So how do you make sure yours stands out and makes the right impression for your brand? Here are a few tips. 1. Ask yourself why you are sending the card. Start by asking why are you sending this card in the first place? Send a holiday card to clients/customers, contacts you hope to work in the future, people that you talk to regularly, and people that help your business' work (like lawyers and accountants). Thank your customers. But don’t “ask”. This isn’t the vehicle for a year-end sales pitch. And

Storytelling is not: “Our product does X, and you should buy it because Y.” Storytelling is a much more powerful way to help people understand what you’re all about other than simply explaining "this is what we do, here's why you should buy." As consumers expect more from the companies with whom they do business, storytelling is the key to getting through to them. At Spencer Brenneman, LLC, we are helping a European company introduce its product to the U.S. market. Storytelling will play a central part in how we position the offering in a way that is relevant and competitively differentiated from the other choices consumers have. [tweetshare tweet= "Storytelling is not: “Our product does X, and you should

Recently, a client asked me to speak to a group of professionals re-entering the marketing workforce after a few years out. Specifically, the focus was what’s changed in modern marketing. How much time do you have? I started our discussion with “Things that are no longer a thing*.” The asterisk points to this caveat: “Or, at least not as a big a thing as they used to be.” This month, I thought I would share my list: Hardcore hierarchy and tenure as a trump card “Life-short” learning Sales and marketing divide Collateral-based sales support Email (on so many levels) Build it, and they will come Granted, at some companies and in some markets the degrees to which these statements apply vary. However, I

A colleague recently shared with me that her company is facing an acquisition. Although she remains positive, there is always a certain amount of trepidation that comes along when merging brands. I know! I’ve been there, and helping companies face the branding challenges inherent to mergers and acquisitions is one of the reasons we’re in business. Although it’s never too late to update a brand strategy, most of the time people do think about it too late, especially in the context of mergers and acquisitions. Here are my top five reasons -- there are more! -- why any merger or acquisition must keep the brand strategy front and center from the very beginning.   Why merging brands must think ahead about their strategy It’s

CMO branding! Like everything, the role of the modern Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) keeps changing. From a greater responsibility for impacting sales to higher expectations around ROI, CMOs have a lot going on -- particularly those at small- to mid-sized businesses (SMBs) who usually have to do more with less (that hasn’t changed). The good news is that SMB CMOs can leverage the brand strategy to meet those challenges, even when capital and human resources may be limited. How? Use the brand strategy to give the entire company what they need to contribute to meeting the marketing agenda. Engagement. When employees rally around a brand, everything improves for the better: the work ethic (people work harder), customer service (renewals get easier), territorial