brand strategy Tag

Big data gets a lot of press, as it should, for making the best decisions possible especially when it comes to marketing. Another potential use of big data is helping companies build their brands. CNBC’s Elizabeth Gurdus recapped an interview between The Gap, Inc., President and CEO Art Peck and CNBC’s Jim Cramer, host of Mad Money. In it, he shares some impressive ways Gap uses big data to our maneuver the competition, such as: Direct its advertising dollars in the most effective way to get the best returns Provide insights into what consumers want in a company Pinpoint where the value is But this comment from Peck at a J.P. Morgan retail conference gives us another clue towards the potential of

“I don’t have an opinion. I don’t know their rebranding strategy.” That’s the answer I usually give when someone asks me what I think of a high-profile rebrand, such as the 2016 rebrand of Uber and last year’s rebrand of Accenture and Mozilla. Of course, I always have my personal, visceral reactions to some rebrands, but for the most part, what do my personal opinions matter? As for my professional opinions, one can argue that those may matter, however, only in the presence of the company’s rebranding strategy. Rebranding doesn’t or shouldn’t happen out of boredom, but rather, out of some experienced, expected, or desired change in the business, market, or customers’ needs. How can anyone judge a rebrand if

Before I address the topic of Toys R Us and what we can all learn from the unfortunate demise of this iconic (if not grammatically challenged) retailer, let me first throw out that I know next to nothing about toys. What I do know is few brands authentically understand what they’re selling, and I think the unfortunate demise of this iconic (if not grammatically challenged) retailer is case in point. Before the shopping with your fingertips and not your feet took over, Toy R Us had a perfectly rational business and brand strategy. Their years of success were a testament to that. However, as the world began to change, I can only assume they did not, at least not enough. According to

It’s critical for everyone to understand your brand strategy and brand system, which is where brand education programs come in. But what happens after the training? How do you keep the enthusiasm alive and the learnings actionable? Here are five suggestions: Reward successes. Are there people in your organization who took to heart the brand education program? Are they embracing the brand strategy with all their might and seeing great success? Reward them! Prizes, profiles, gifts: whatever works in your corporate culture. Create brand champions. Some organizations call them brand ambassadors, some champions, but the result is the same; People within the organization whom you have deputized as brand experts. They will need a bit more training and tools to do their jobs, but having

Recently I had the great opportunity to present a webinar to members of the In-House Agency Forum, a professional association for those companies which rely on internal agencies to meet their marketing needs. In-house agencies face a number of challenges that traditional, external agencies do not: not the least of which is balancing the client v. colleague dynamic. I especially love speaking to this group because they are in a unique position to influence the growth and support of their brands. (I also love these kinds of webinars because I get to assume that everyone is laughing riotously at all my jokes.)   The questions brand education can answer Throughout the webinar, we asked some questions, which participants answered in real time. Can you confidently

Recently, a client asked me to speak to a group of professionals re-entering the marketing workforce after a few years out. Specifically, the focus was what’s changed in modern marketing. How much time do you have? I started our discussion with “Things that are no longer a thing*.” The asterisk points to this caveat: “Or, at least not as a big a thing as they used to be.” This month, I thought I would share my list: Hardcore hierarchy and tenure as a trump card “Life-short” learning Sales and marketing divide Collateral-based sales support Email (on so many levels) Build it, and they will come Granted, at some companies and in some markets the degrees to which these statements apply vary. However, I

The well-designed annual report with the strategic intent of communicating with ALL a company's audiences goes well beyond your investors and pages of financials and legal notes to serve as a signature channel for your brand. In fact, the Annual Report is an important tool in your brand arsenal. Delivering that information and your story is critical, but many brands don't yet seize the opportunity by integrating their annual report in the overall brand strategy. While mandatory for many organizations and a powerful tool for others, this single communication presents information about your organization to many different audiences. How those readers engage with your Annual Report content influences their perceptions of your company in powerful ways. While an annual report is different

 As 2017 wrapped up, we asked some of Spencer Brenneman’s favorites to share their thoughts on what’s to come in 2018 in terms of marketing and branding trends. Here they are! Don’t be shy! Add your thoughts, either in agreement or disagreement! We can take it! Reply here or contact us! Kim Vanni LinkedIn Designer, Art Director, and all-around Creative Chick Kim Vanni, designs While Millennial Pink may not disappear, bolder color palettes will be everywhere and juxtaposed in unexpected combinations, especially in photography and typography (Pantone’s Color of the Year for 2018 is Ultra Violet). Likewise, look for double-exposure treatments in graphics and type and a continuation of the geometric–print trend with new and bold textures/backgrounds. The counterbalance: hand-drawn graphics and fonts, and a

There are plenty of case studies, agencies, and data out there to help large, behemoth retailers create their brand strategies, small business branding? It’s a modern-day “Marcia, Marcia, Marcia,” for mom and pops who want to create brands that help build their businesses, regardless of its size. In honor of the American Express Small Business Saturday(r), we take a look at five opportunities small retailers have to turn the tables on the big ones. Granted, it is easier for companies to build their brands when they have enough resources for Super Bowl ads, subway banners, and free shipping or severe discounts. So, how can small business branding help? The answer here for small business is customer advocacy through both word of mouth

Many marketers are getting data all wrong. Are you? Here are some stats I came across last week, and they should not surprise anyone. Anyone, of course, other than the marketers who chase after the 50-something demographic, because apparently, they’re doing it all wrong. According to a study from social networking sites Gransnet and Mumsnet, 85% of Brits aged 50 or over believe ads aimed at older people rely on stereotypes, with 79% claiming that advertisers patronize their age group. It goes on to say that this group hates words like “older,” “‘silver,” “‘mature,” and “senior.” More than half (52%) say brands whose ads resonate with them win their business. I can relate. Every once and awhile, a perfectly lovely morning walk with our