brand strategy Tag

Providing an informative and efficient user interface (UI) experience is a key component of your organization’s brand. Similar to any consumer or B2B experience, people have ongoing and competing demands for their time—make their website visits positive, and you are setting yourself up for repeat business and more satisfied customers. When it comes to UI and brand, most B2B companies are faced with the challenge of needing to explain an abundance of information, so displaying this in an efficient manner is extremely important.     UI and Brand Overview UI combines interaction design, visual design, and information architecture, all of which need to support each brand’s identity to the degree it can without compromising usability.  Consumers have become familiar with interface elements acting

Creating a luxury brand is no easy feat. It's often a challenge because provenance—the story, or the heritage, behind luxury brands—can’t be made overnight; no matter how much a company invests in the branding of their luxury clothing line, Audrey Hepburn isn’t going to wear it. Coco Chanel, on the other hand, can produce any number of pictures with Hepburn wearing their clothing. However, despite the challenges, there are plenty of examples to show that a luxury brand can be made from the ground up. For example, Toyota created the Lexus brand to compete with Mercedes and BMW and in the early 1990s. Just 20 years before, Toyota cars had been the but of jokes for their perceived poor quality. Nobody

A few months ago, I overheard a friend talking about something called, “view.” Whatever it was, he was in love with it. Something about cutting the cord and an alternative to SlingTV. Thus begins our cautionary tale of product naming. A few weeks later, in my semi-regular rant against cable, I texted him for more information. “What is this ‘View’ of which you spoke?” “No, it’s PlayStation Vue,” he wrote, “but it has nothing to do with PlayStation. It’s incredible.” Never assume everyone knows what you know. It seems that I was not the only one in the dark about PlayStation Vue. As Jared Newman writes in his TechHive CORD-CUTTER CONFIDENTIAL, Sony’s streaming TV service earns high marks from users but is struggling nonetheless. Newman walks

Storytelling is not: “Our product does X, and you should buy it because Y.” Storytelling is a much more powerful way to help people understand what you’re all about than simply explaining "this is what we do, here's why you should buy." As consumers expect more from the companies with whom they do business, storytelling is the key to getting through to them. At Spencer Brenneman, we are helping a European company introduce its product to the U.S. market. Storytelling will play a central part in how we position the offering in a way that is relevant and competitively differentiated from the other choices consumers have. Can you swap out your name with your competitor’s and still have it sound right? So,

Our recent white paper on making data-driven design decisions was born from a presentation I was asked to make at the 2018 HOW Design Live conference. The presentation, “From Gift Wrapper to Strategic Partner: How Creatives Can Elevate the World’s Perception of Their Work,” focused on how using data and improving the relationship between Creatives and Executives, can lead to a better creative process. Since the white paper covered the first part, data-driven design decisions, this blog post will cover the second: improving the relationship between Creative and Executives (i.e., the people who make the final decisions on a project). In building the relationship, we talked about three main areas: Walking in their shoes Taking your seat at the table Bringing

Rapidly changing consumer demands for humanity and how Starbucks is tackling racial bias. Let’s talk about Starbucks. Unless you’re in a coma, you must have heard about the two black men arrested in a Philadelphia Starbucks for sitting there without ordering anything. First, let’s discuss the obvious. I am not a person of color. My experience with racial bias is second hand, limited to accounts shared by friends and from what I read. And even though I am an openly gay white man, who understands discrimination firsthand, I am nonetheless still a white man living in a society of rules and biases created for white men. So, my ability to comment on whether or not what Starbucks is doing is enough,

Big data gets a lot of press, as it should, for making the best decisions possible especially when it comes to marketing. Another potential use of big data is helping companies build their brands. CNBC’s Elizabeth Gurdus recapped an interview between The Gap, Inc., President and CEO Art Peck and CNBC’s Jim Cramer, host of Mad Money. In it, he shares some impressive ways Gap uses big data to our maneuver the competition, such as: Direct its advertising dollars in the most effective way to get the best returns Provide insights into what consumers want in a company Pinpoint where the value is But this comment from Peck at a J.P. Morgan retail conference gives us another clue towards the potential of

“I don’t have an opinion. I don’t know their rebranding strategy.” That’s the answer I usually give when someone asks me what I think of a high-profile rebrand, such as the 2016 rebrand of Uber and last year’s rebrand of Accenture and Mozilla. Of course, I always have my personal, visceral reactions to some rebrands, but for the most part, what do my personal opinions matter? As for my professional opinions, one can argue that those may matter, however, only in the presence of the company’s rebranding strategy. Rebranding doesn’t or shouldn’t happen out of boredom, but rather, out of some experienced, expected, or desired change in the business, market, or customers’ needs. How can anyone judge a rebrand if

Before I address the topic of Toys R Us and what we can all learn from the unfortunate demise of this iconic (if not grammatically challenged) retailer, let me first throw out that I know next to nothing about toys. What I do know is few brands authentically understand what they’re selling, and I think the unfortunate demise of this iconic (if not grammatically challenged) retailer is case in point. Before the shopping with your fingertips and not your feet took over, Toy R Us had a perfectly rational business and brand strategy. Their years of success were a testament to that. However, as the world began to change, I can only assume they did not, at least not enough. According to

It’s critical for everyone to understand your brand strategy and brand system, which is where brand education programs come in. But what happens after the training? How do you keep the enthusiasm alive and the learnings actionable? Here are five suggestions: Reward successes. Are there people in your organization who took to heart the brand education program? Are they embracing the brand strategy with all their might and seeing great success? Reward them! Prizes, profiles, gifts: whatever works in your corporate culture. Create brand champions. Some organizations call them brand ambassadors, some champions, but the result is the same; People within the organization whom you have deputized as brand experts. They will need a bit more training and tools to do their jobs, but having