verbal identity Tag

A few months ago, I overheard a friend talking about something called, “view.” Whatever it was, he was in love with it. Something about cutting the cord and an alternative to SlingTV. Thus begins our cautionary tale of product naming. A few weeks later, in my semi-regular rant against cable, I texted him for more information. “What is this ‘View’ of which you spoke?” “No, it’s PlayStation Vue,” he wrote, “but it has nothing to do with PlayStation. It’s incredible.” Never assume everyone knows what you know. It seems that I was not the only one in the dark about PlayStation Vue. As Jared Newman writes in his TechHive CORD-CUTTER CONFIDENTIAL, Sony’s streaming TV service earns high marks from users but is struggling nonetheless. Newman walks

Storytelling is not: “Our product does X, and you should buy it because Y.” Storytelling is a much more powerful way to help people understand what you’re all about than simply explaining "this is what we do, here's why you should buy." As consumers expect more from the companies with whom they do business, storytelling is the key to getting through to them. At Spencer Brenneman, we are helping a European company introduce its product to the U.S. market. Storytelling will play a central part in how we position the offering in a way that is relevant and competitively differentiated from the other choices consumers have. Can you swap out your name with your competitor’s and still have it sound right? So,

Our recent white paper on making data-driven design decisions was born from a presentation I was asked to make at the 2018 HOW Design Live conference. The presentation, “From Gift Wrapper to Strategic Partner: How Creatives Can Elevate the World’s Perception of Their Work,” focused on how using data and improving the relationship between Creatives and Executives, can lead to a better creative process. Since the white paper covered the first part, data-driven design decisions, this blog post will cover the second: improving the relationship between Creative and Executives (i.e., the people who make the final decisions on a project). In building the relationship, we talked about three main areas: Walking in their shoes Taking your seat at the table Bringing

“I don’t have an opinion. I don’t know their rebranding strategy.” That’s the answer I usually give when someone asks me what I think of a high-profile rebrand, such as the 2016 rebrand of Uber and last year’s rebrand of Accenture and Mozilla. Of course, I always have my personal, visceral reactions to some rebrands, but for the most part, what do my personal opinions matter? As for my professional opinions, one can argue that those may matter, however, only in the presence of the company’s rebranding strategy. Rebranding doesn’t or shouldn’t happen out of boredom, but rather, out of some experienced, expected, or desired change in the business, market, or customers’ needs. How can anyone judge a rebrand if

The well-designed annual report with the strategic intent of communicating with ALL a company's audiences goes well beyond your investors and pages of financials and legal notes to serve as a signature channel for your brand. In fact, the Annual Report is an important tool in your brand arsenal. Delivering that information and your story is critical, but many brands don't yet seize the opportunity by integrating their annual report in the overall brand strategy. While mandatory for many organizations and a powerful tool for others, this single communication presents information about your organization to many different audiences. How those readers engage with your Annual Report content influences their perceptions of your company in powerful ways. While an annual report is different

 As 2017 wrapped up, we asked some of Spencer Brenneman’s favorites to share their thoughts on what’s to come in 2018 in terms of marketing and branding trends. Here they are! Don’t be shy! Add your thoughts, either in agreement or disagreement! We can take it! Reply here or contact us! Kim Vanni LinkedIn Designer, Art Director, and all-around Creative Chick Kim Vanni, designs While Millennial Pink may not disappear, bolder color palettes will be everywhere and juxtaposed in unexpected combinations, especially in photography and typography (Pantone’s Color of the Year for 2018 is Ultra Violet). Likewise, look for double-exposure treatments in graphics and type and a continuation of the geometric–print trend with new and bold textures/backgrounds. The counterbalance: hand-drawn graphics and fonts, and a

When you think of a branding, what comes to mind? To many, a branding stops at a logo, an ad, and maybe a catchy slogan. Those are just the cosmetics. To us, a brand is like a person. It has a face and voice. It has its own unique personality that resonates with customers and sparks a connection. At Spencer Brenneman, our philosophy revolves around one simple idea. In order for our customers’ businesses to thrive, they have to start with their branding strategy. Starting with brand means helping companies understand their higher purposes, the why they do what they do. It’s the foundation of their belief system. Getting them there is part strategy, part research, with just a little bit of

“I want to hire you to make my company go viral!” Seems easy enough, I’ll just work my Social Media Magic, say the magic word, and it’ll happen! Alas, it doesn’t actually work that way. Going “viral” is no easy task and is very VERY hard to plan for. But there are a few things you can do to set your marketing campaign up for success and (hopefully) make it go viral! A. Know who you are targeting. — Make sure you’ve got your demographics down to the letter. For example, this could be College age students, women, ages 18-24, who live in the US (east coast and California). B. Know your message. — What are you saying? What is the point you are trying to

A colleague recently shared with me that her company is facing an acquisition. Although she remains positive, there is always a certain amount of trepidation that comes along when merging brands. I know! I’ve been there, and helping companies face the branding challenges inherent to mergers and acquisitions is one of the reasons we’re in business. Although it’s never too late to update a brand strategy, most of the time people do think about it too late, especially in the context of mergers and acquisitions. Here are my top five reasons -- there are more! -- why any merger or acquisition must keep the brand strategy front and center from the very beginning.   Why merging brands must think ahead about their strategy It’s