April 2018 | Spencer Brenneman, LLC

April 2018

Rapidly changing consumer demands for humanity and how Starbucks is tackling racial bias. Let’s talk about Starbucks. Unless you’re in a coma, you must have heard about the two black men arrested in a Philadelphia Starbucks for sitting there without ordering anything. First, let’s discuss the obvious. I am not a person of color. My experience with racial bias is second hand, limited to accounts shared by friends and from what I read. And even though I am an openly gay white man, who understands discrimination firsthand, I am nonetheless still a white man living in a society of rules and biases created for white men. So, my ability to comment on whether or not what Starbucks is doing is enough,

Big data gets a lot of press, as it should, for making the best decisions possible especially when it comes to marketing. Another potential use of big data is helping companies build their brands. CNBC’s Elizabeth Gurdus recapped an interview between The Gap, Inc., President and CEO Art Peck and CNBC’s Jim Cramer, host of Mad Money. In it, he shares some impressive ways Gap uses big data to out-maneuver the competition, such as: Direct its advertising dollars in the most effective way to get the best returns Provide insights into what consumers want in a company Pinpoint where the value is But this comment from Peck at a J.P. Morgan retail conference gives us another clue towards the potential of big data

It's never polite to ask if someone's had work done, so Douglas will spare you the embarrassment and suspense. We have! We have a new website! It's on a much more robust platform, sports an added expression to our visual identity and, most importantly, our new messaging platform: Start with Brand™! [tweetshare tweet= "The right brand strategy [

Your product: Know what, to whom, and when you're selling it. Welcome to Spring! And welcome to the April issue of our monthly newsletter. This month we are asking three not so simple questions: What are you selling? To whom are you selling it? And, when? Check out these lessons from Toys R Us and JenAir as well as some new thinking from the Harvard Business Review. WHAT: Toys Weren't Them Before shopping with your fingertips and not your feet took over, Toy R Us had a perfectly rational business and brand strategy. Their years of success were a testament to that. However, as the world began to change, they did not. Toys R Us had no business selling toys. Continued on spencerbrenneman.com TO WHOM: JenAir Rebrand In our opinion, JenAir's recently announced